Section 508 Website Accessibility

Skip to site navigation Skip to main content
Skip to main content
Elaine Marieb Nicpon College of Health and Human Services

Marieb College of Health and Human Services

Dennis Hunt, Ed.D., CSCS
Dennis Hunt, Ed.D., CSCS

Assistant Professor - Rehabilitation Sciences
Phone: (239) 590-7536
E-Mail: dhunt@fgcu.edu
Office: Marieb Hall 428

Dr. Dennis Hunt, founding Program Director for the Exercise Science program, currently holds the rank of Assistant Professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Sciences.  He has extensive experience in both the wellness and human performance fields. Dr. Hunt earned his B.S. from Manchester College, and his M.A. from Ball State University. He completed his doctoral degree from the University of Central Florida with a specialization in Wellness and Exercise Physiology with a cognate of Cardiopulmonary Sciences. He is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist through the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). Dr. Hunt holds advanced certifications from the American Council on Exercise as a Fitness Nutrition Specialist and from the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine (A4M) in Sports Medicine. Dr. Hunt has held previous positions prior to his arrival at FGCU in 2001, as an Exercise Physiologist, Strength and Conditioning Coordinator, Chair of the Department of Exercise and Health Sciences and Director of Wellness and Nutritional Services.

My role as a teacher is to bring the world of Exercise Science to life for the learner through the application of exercise physiology and human performance principles.  Exercise Science contains a vast array of information on the human body that can enlighten a learner in order to assist others increase their quality of life and avoid the pitfalls of lifestyle oriented diseases.  It is also a world that contains knowledge related to the enhancement of human performance in a variety of important activities.  I am passionate about sharing my knowledge on the role and importance of exercise, especially resistance training in the lives of others.  My primary objective in teaching is to have students be able to apply what they are learning in the classroom in “real-life” situations.  The field of Exercise Science should be a field of applying evidence-based, best practices to authentic scenarios and I approach my teaching of the subject in that manner.  

I believe that it is essential that the students I teach are adequately prepared to be fully engaged in the learning process during “class” time.  The face to face classes that I teach are fast-paced, and engaging.  Success is dependent on a student’s preparation and ability to thinking critically in a variety of exercise science based scenarios.  Frequently, I use examples and “real-life” scenarios about what students are assigned to read in their textbooks to affirm what they know.  This exchange of knowing and applying is found in the majority of the courses that I teach.  Learning is connected with critically analyzing evidence-based principles associated with physical activity/exercise and applying those principles in diverse populations with diverse goals. 

I believe that the emotion of passion for what one does or is willing to do should carry an individual past mediocrity and towards the fulfillment of their potential and excellence.  In this regard I seek to encourage and involve my students so that they can come closer to reaching their potential and excellence.  However, my teaching methodology is eclectic.  My approach for each class is different and dependent on the student population and the course being taught.  Students obtain rudimentary knowledge, skills and abilities (KSAs) first then apply those KSAs using a case study approach that reinforces their critical thinking skills.  Assessment of student knowledge is also approached using a multi-faceted design.  Students are assessed using traditional “face-to-face” exams, however since most of the courses I teach are “hybrid” courses (i.e. using both a “face-to-face” and virtual learning format), students are also exposed to taking exams online.  Students are also assessed using laboratory activities and midterm and final exam practicals, when appropriate.  These types of assessments of student knowledge, skills and abilities are intended to allow students to demonstrate how they critically analyze, apply principles and protocols of exercise physiology in a variety of situations.  Additionally, students routinely complete projects related to the particular objectives of a course.  In most courses participation, homework, quizzes and discussion boards are also used to help in the evaluation of student learning.  The use of multiple evaluation strategies provides for an enhanced method of assessment of students that utilize different learning styles to succeed.

I have taught the following courses during my more than 20 years of teaching:

Undergraduate Courses:

  • Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription
  • Fitness Assessment Lab
  • Methods of Resistance Training and Conditioning
  • Resistance Training Lab
  • Human Performance and Energy Supplies
  • Foundations of Health Related Physical Fitness
  • Clinical Exercise Physiology
  • Environmental Exercise Physiology
  • Research Methods in Healthcare
  • Experiential Learning I & II (Site Supervisor and Faculty Supervisor)
  • Personal Fitness and Wellness
  • Movement Science I (Response to Exercise Modules)
  • Movement Science II (Exercise Physiology Modules)
  • Introduction to Athletic Training (Resistance Training Lectures)
  • Athletic Training Practice I (Strength and Conditioning Module)
  • Human Performance – Coaching Theory
  • Health Promotion and Wellness Program Planning and Management
  • Kinesiology
  • Methods of Coaching
  • Strength Training and Body Building
  • Motor Learning
  • Personal Fitness
  • Directed Field Experience

Graduate Courses:

  • Training and Conditioning for Sport and Fitness Activities
  • Exercise Physiology and Health
  • Energy Supplies and Human Performance
  • Wellness Development and Children
  • Physical Therapy Practice I (Therapeutic Exercise Module)
  • Physical Therapy Practice V (Wellness/Exercise Physiology Case)
  • Movement Science I (Response to Exercise Modules)
  • Movement Science II (Exercise Physiology Modules)

Research and Scholarly Interests:

  • Aquatic Exercise
  • Ergogenic aids and human performance
  • Evidence-based muscular fitness programs
  • Exercise and obesity
  • Geriatrics and resistance training
  • Wellness

Scholarly Works:

Publications:

Hunt D, Chapa D, Lynn C. A relatively new addition ICD-10-CM Code M62.64: Do you know what it is for and how to diagnose and treat? National Nurse Symposium. Keystone, CO. July 20-22, 2018.

Jackson KL, Hunt D, Chapa D, Gropper SS. Sarcopenia- a baby boomers dilemma for nurse practitioners to discover, diagnose, and treat. Journal of Nursing Education and Practice. 2018;8(9). doi: 10.5430/xyz.v1n1p1

Hunt D, Chapa D, Hess B, Swanick K, Groper SS. The effects of a progressive resistance exercise approach to training an adult classified as Sarcopenic. International Journal of Studies in Nursing. 2017;2(1). doi:10.20849/ijsn.v2i1.136  

Hunt D, Chapa DW, Hess B, Swanick K, Hovanec A. The Importance of Resistance Training in the Treatment of Sarcopenia.  Journal of Nursing Education and Practice.  2015;5(3):39-43.

Chapa DW, Akintade B, Son H, Woltz P, Hunt D, Friedmann E, Hartung M, Thomas SA.  Pathophysiological Relationships Between Heart Failure, and Depression and Anxiety.  Critical Care Nurse.  April 2014;34:14-25.

Hunt D, Williamson E, Rautenkranz K.  The Effect of Progressive Resistance Training on Strength in the Lower Extremities of Individuals Older Than 80 years of Age.  International Journal of Aging and Society. 2012;1(2):41-54.

Published Abstracts:

Hunt D, Swanick K, Hovanec A, The Effects of Progressive Resistance Exercise versus a Power-Periodization Exercise Approach to Training Very Old Adults at Risk for Sarcopenia.  Medicine and Science in Exercise and Sport. 2013;45:5.

Hunt D, Williamson E, Rautenkranz K.  The Effect of Progressive Resistance Training on Strength in the Lower Extremities of Individuals Older Than 80 years of Age.  Medicine and Science in Exercise and Sport. 2011;43:S7.

Swanick K, Spencer A, Hunt D.  A Comparison of a Web-Based and a Traditional Face to Face Off-Season Training Program For Div I Softball Players:  A Pilot Study.  Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy.  2009;39:#1 A117.

Evans A, Williamson E, Hunt D.  Assessing The Wellness Needs of Residents of a Continuing Care Retirement Community.  Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy.  2004;27(3):123-4.

Books:

Hunt D, Shamus E. Anterior Shin Splints. In Shamus E, The Color Atlas of Physical Therapy. NY, New York: McGraw-Hill Publishing,  2015.  ISBN: 978-0-07-181351-8

Hunt D, Shamus, E. Anterior Shin Splints. In Shamus E. Quick Answers, E-book. NY, New York: McGraw-Hill Publishers, 2013.  www.accessphysiotherapy.com.

Textbook Reviews

Muth N. Sports Nutrition for Health Professionals. Philadelphia, PA: F. A. Davis, 2015.

Wojtek, Chodzko-Zajko.  ACSM’s Exercise for Older Adults. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott,Williams & Wilkins,  2013.

Turley J, Thompson J. Nutrition: Your Life Science.  Florence, KY: Cengage Publishers, 2011.

Hendrick-Fink H, Burgoon LA, Mikesky AE. Practical Applications in Sports Nutrition, 2e.  Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers, 2009.

International Research Presentations and Symposia

Hunt D,  Swanick K, Chapa D, Hovanec A.  The Effects of a Progressive Resistance Exercise (PRE) Approach to Training an Adult.  International Scientific Forum.  Tirana, Albania, 2013.  (Accepted for presentation)

Williamson EK, Hunt D, Rautenkranz K.  The Effect of Progressive Resistance Training on Strength in the Lower Extremities of Individuals Older Than 80 years of Age.  World Congress of Physical Therapy Conference.  Amsterdam, Holland, 2011. (Accepted for presentation)

Hunt D, Wong D, Hovanec A.  Utilizing a Linear Periodization Resistance Training Model to Enhance Sport Performance of Female Athletes.  Petro-Canada Sport Leadership Sportif, Vancouver, Canada, 2009.

Williamson EK, Hunt D.  An Analyses of Physical Therapy Practice Related to Obesity Management. World Congress of Physical Therapy Conference.  Vancouver, Canada, 2009.

Hunt D.  Strength and Conditioning Activities for Athletes.  Federacion Mexicana De Baloncesto Camp and Clinic, Mexico City, Mexico, 2006.

Hunt D.  Training Skill Fitness in Athletes.  Coaches Basketball School, Rybnik, Poland, 2006.

Hunt D. Periodization in Sport.  Raciborz University, Raciborz, Poland, 2006.

Hunt D. Seminario Potencia Fiscia.  La Confederacion Deportiva Autonoma de Guatemala, Guatemala City, Guatemala, 2004.

National Research Presentations

Hunt D, Swanick K, Hovanec A. The Effects of a Power-Periodization versus a Progressive Resistnace Exercise Approach to Training Very Old Adults at Risk for Sarcopenia.  American College of Sports Medcine’s 60th Annual Meeting and 4th World Congress on Exercise is Medicine Conference.  Indianapolis, IN, 2013. (Peer-reviewed invitation)

Swanick K, Hunt D, Hovanec A.  The Effects of Progressive Resistance Exercise versus a Power-Periodization Exercise Approach to Training Very Old Adults at Risk for Sarcopenia.  APTA Combined Sections Meeting.  San Diego, CA, 2013. (Peer-reviewed invitation)

Hunt D, Williamson E, Rautenkranz K.  The Effects of Progressive Resistance Training on Strength of Individuals Older Than 80 Years of Age.  The Aging and Society: An Interdisciplinary Conference.  Berkley, CA, 2011. (Peer-reviewed invitation)

Hunt D, Williamson E, Rautenkranz K. The Effects of Progressive Resistance Training on Strength of Individuals Older Than 80 Years of Age.  Scientific Program of the 2011 NSCA National Conference.  Las Vegas, Nevada, 2011.  (Peer-reviewed invitation)

Hunt D, Williamson E, Rautenkranz K. The Effects of Progressive Resistance Training on Strength of Individuals Older Than 80 Years of Age.  World Congress on Exercise is Medicine and the 58th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine.  Denver, CO, 2011.  (Peer-reviewed)

Lupe L, Chapa DW, Hunt D. Impact of nurse/nurse practitioner run clinic on patients with heart failure. American Association of Heart Failure Nurses, 6th Annual Meeting, Orlando FL. Awarded Clinical Innovation Showcase Award, 2010. (Peer-reviewed invitation)

Craddock J, Hunt D. Interrater Reliability in Athletic Training Education.  3rd Biennial SEATA Athletic Training Educators’ Conference.  Atlanta, GA, 2010.

Spencer A, Hunt D, Swanick K.  A Comparison of a Web-based and Traditional Face to Face Off Season Training Program for Division I Softball Players: A Pilot Study.  APTA Combined Sections Meeting, Las Vegas NV, 2009.  (Peer-reviewed invitation)

Spencer A, Hunt D, Swanick K. A Comparison of a Web-Based and a Traditional Face to Face Off Season Training Program for Division I Softball Players: A Pilot Study.  Scientific Program, National Strength and Conditioning Association’s National Conference, 2008.   (Peer-reviewed invitation)

Hunt D, Stejskal K.  Designing a Sport Specific Training Program for a High School Girls’ Basketball Team. Scientific Program, National Strength and Conditioning Association’s National Conference, 2007.  (Peer-reviewed invitation)

Kleinmann D, Hunt D, Swanick K, Felton S. The Effects of the Finch Windmill on In-Season Throwing Velocity and Shoulder Strength in High School Baseball Pitchers.  Scientific Program, National Strength and Conditioning Association’s National Conference, 2007. (Peer-reviewed invitation)

Invited Lectures and Symposia

Chambers S, Swanick K, Hunt D.  Platform Presentation: The Effects of Aquatic Plyometric Training on Vertical Jump and Muscle Soreness.  Florida Physical Therapy Association Fall Conference.  Daytona Beach, Florida, 2011. 

Hunt D.  Perseverance, Passion and Potential.  2010 Leadership Summit.  Florida Gulf Coast University, 2010.

Chapa DW, Hunt D, Lewis M. Vigilance through Compassion and Competence, Depression and Heart Failure. Evidence-Based Practice Conference, Lee Memorial Healthcare System, 2009.

Hunt D. Keeping the E in Your Athletes Training Programs.  Florida Athletic Coaches Association (FACA) Winter Meetings, Daytona Beach, Florida, 2005.

Hunt D.  Resistance Training and Its Implications To Your Wellness.  Renaissance Academy, Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, FL. November, 2004.

Hunt D.  Sports Specific Training Clinic.  Community School of Naples.  Naples, FL, 2004.

Hunt D.  Sport Specific Training for Basketball, Gulf Coast High School.  Naples, FL, 2003.     

Hunt D. Sport Specific Instructor.  Fellowship of Christian Athletes Summer Camp. Marshall, IN, 1998.

Hunt D. Sport Specific Instructor.  Fellowship of Christian Athletes Summer Camp. Marshall, IN, 1997.

Mitchell D, Hunt D. Technology: Fitness and Physical Education Workshop.  University of Central Florida.  Orlando, FL

Hunt D. Components of Fitness and Conditioning.  Law Enforcement Bicycle Association’s National Mountain Bike Instructors Course.  Orlando, FL, 1995.

Hunt D. Guest Lecturer – Introduction to Allied Health.  University of Central Florida.  Orlando, FL, 1995.

Hunt D. Guest Lecturer – Introduction to Allied Health.  University of Central Florida.  Orlando, FL, 1994.

Hunt D. Camp Instructor.  NBA Orlando Magic Basketball Camp.  Orlando, FL, 1994.

Hunt D.  Women and Exercise.  Southeast University and Central Florida Area Health Education Center.  Continuing Education Program for Nurses, 1992.

Hunt D. Guest Lecturer – Introduction to Allied Health.  University of Central Florida.  Orlando, FL, 1992.

Hunt D. Coaching Effectiveness and Sport Participant Conditioning Programming.  Central Florida Youth Football Coaches Association, 1991.

Hunt D.  Eating Disorder:  The Hidden Disease.  What makes up a healthy fitness program?  Glenbeigh Hospital Extension Program.  Orlando, FL, 1991.

Hunt D.  Fitness and Your Quality of Life.  Alliance of American Insurers, 1991. 

Hunt D. Why do we need to exercise?  Imagination Station—Children’s Radio Program. Orlando, FL, 1991

Hunt D. What is a wellness lifestyle?  Why is it important to maintain one?  Center for DrugFree Living.  Orlando, FL, 1990.

Hunt D. The importance of physical fitness and wellness to quality of life.  Lake County Teachers Association.  Leesburg, FL, 1989.

Funding Activities

Hunt D, Cordova M, Chapa D, Hess B, Black S.  Law Enforcement Occupational (LEO) Fitness Project – Risk Identification Program, Phase II  $63,915, 2013.

Hunt D, Cordova M, Chapa D, Hess B, Black S.  Law Enforcement Occupational Fitness Project – Phase I.   $69,520, 2012.

Chapa DW, Hunt D, Lupe L.  Combined Aerobic and Resistance Exercise Program.   Foundation Grant from FGCU for cardiac monitoring equipment.  $40,000, 2009.

Hunt D. Cycling Performance Program.  $500, 2008.

Hunt D. Peak Performance Grant.  $750, 2005.

Mitchell D, Hunt D.  Physical Education Gateway.  Academic Initiatives in Strategic Planning Award Program, Division of Sponsored Research.  $37,543, 1996.

Mitchell D, Hunt D. Project FIT.  In-House Award Program.  $7500, 1996.

Mitchell D, Hunt D. Life-Long Commitment to Wellness Project.  $1,000, 1995.

 

Dr. Hunt has developed many positive relationships within FGCU and in the community during his years in the profession. He performs consulting work for local law enforcement agencies, works closely with FGCU’s Athletics Department, and participates in various service opportunities through his memberships with ACSM and NSCA. In an extension of his association with the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine and his fellowship in Metabolic and Nutritional Medicine, Dr. Hunt also spearheads the initiative “Go Exercise” for individuals and communities. The Go Exercise programs are aimed at assisting people in discerning the correct form of exercise for their individual health and long-term wellness.